USE ME

Home Depot Accused of Violating Civil Rights of Job Applicants with Criminal Records

HOME DEPOT ACCUSED OF VIOLATING CIVIL RIGHTS OF JOB APPLICANTS WITH CRIMINAL RECORDS

Please read this and also forward to others who might know of people
who have been denied employment at Home Depot due to the prior criminal
history.
Lois

Please see the notice below regarding a Title
VII national class charge recently filed against Home Depot based on
its failure to hire applicants due to their prior conviction history:
HOME DEPOT ACCUSED OF VIOLATING CIVIL RIGHTS OF JOB APPLICANTS WITH CRIMINAL RECORDS
Two African-American men have filed charges of discrimination against
Home Depot alleging that the company's rejection of their job
applications based on their past criminal records violates federal
civil rights laws forbidding race discrimination because the practice
has an adverse impact on African Americans and Hispanics.  The charges
were filed with the New York office of the Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC).   The charging parties are being represented by the
Legal Action Center (www.lac.org),  Outten & Golden LLP (www.outtengolden.com), the National Employment Law Project (www.nelp.org) and Goldstein, Demchak, Baller, Borgen & Dardarian (www.gdblegal.com).

As part of their investigation of these claims, the charging
parties counsel are interested in speaking to other African Americans
and Hispanics who have been rejected for employment by Home Depot
because of a past criminal record.  People in New York State should
contact the Legal Action Center, 212-243-1313 (outside of NY City, call
800-223-4044), and ask to speak to a paralegal about the Home Depot
case.  People in California should contact the National Employment Law
Project, 510-409-2427.  People outside of New York or California should
contact Justin Swartz at Outten & Golden, 212-245-1000.
______________________________

 

________________
This and other news about obstacles to returning home after prison can be found at www.realcostofprisons.org/blog/